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If you’re active on LinkedIn, the chances are good by now that you’re seeing more posts from people in your network. LinkedIn started rolling out long-form publishing capabilities to its members in February, 2014. Some bloggers started using the LinkedIn publishing platform right away, while others have been watching and holding out for a bolt of inspiration to hit them. Others are even still waiting for their publishing capabilities to kick in. I personally wanted to see how the LinkedIn publishing platform worked, so I jumped in as quickly as I could. I can honestly say that I’m pleased with my results so far.

The LinkedIn publishing platform is user-friendly for writers; if you’re familiar with WordPress, then using the LinkedIn publisher is a breeze. For those who are interested in the analytics side, they are able to see the number of real-time views, likes, and shares for each  of their posts. The hardest part for some may be deciding what and when to publish. LinkedIn, itself, recommends you publish what you know best: your own areas of expertise and professional interests. Writing and publishing your first post is probably going to be the hardest one for you – at least it was for me.

These are a few suggestions to keep in mind as you start on your journey to master the art of the LinkedIn publishing platform.

1) The LinkedIn publishing platform allows you to write as much as you desire.

This doesn’t necessarily mean you should write extra long articles though. LinkedIn is home to a predominately professional crowd. People who read articles on LinkedIn typically have a limited amount of time to browse and scan the titles, and even less time to read those which capture their attention. Many of the other LinkedIn publishers I communicate with agree that the most popular posts they publish through the LinkedIn publishing platform fall into the “snackable content” category. According to Media is Power,

“Content is snackable when it is designed for simple and flexible audience consumption.

Sounds perfect for the busy LinkedIn crowd, don’t you think? Give them the content they want and crave, but know you only have a few minutes to grab their interest. The LinkedIn publishing platform probably isn’t the best place to publish your college thesis or eBook if you’re looking for a receptive audience.

2) The LinkedIn publishing platform also allows you to write as often as you desire

Once again, depending on your audience and your content, you may want to spread out the time between your posts on LinkedIn. Post too often and you run the risk of being perceived as a spammer…and LinkedIn doesn’t take kindly to spammers. If you have your own blog for business purposes, you may want to consider using the same, or similar, frequency when posting on LinkedIn.

Once you do start posting on the LinkedIn publishing platform, you’ll find maintaining consistency is a good idea when it comes to how often you post. I find publishing once a week or so is sufficient for my own purposes, but others choose to post more or less often. Either way, you’ll find a schedule that works best for you. In regards to the day and time of day you post, there is no right or wrong for either. However, it’s usually better to post when you know your audience is online.

3) Many of your posts probably won’t be picked up by LinkedIn’s Pulse app – but always be prepared for when it does happen

Being picked up by the Pulse app has apparently become one of the “holy grails” for LinkedIn publishers. When Pulse picks up your post, it’s seen by potentially thousands of additional members – whether they follow you or not. It’s unclear to me how Pulse chooses the posts it features. Most of the articles I see through Pulse seem to be related to current events, career and job hunting,  and/or topics which encourage lively debates.

I’ve seen other LinkedIn writers ask, “how will I know if my article has been picked up by Pulse”? Okay, honestly, I was the one who posed that question to my LinkedIn group, Writing on LinkedIn. The answers I received were all like, “oh, you’ll know it when it happens, trust me.” And that certainly turned out to be the truth. The first three posts I published through the LinkedIn publishing platform did pretty well, in my opinion. I picked up a few hundred views and several likes for each. However, my fourth post took off like a shot, and that’s how I knew I’d been noticed by the Pulse “powers-that-be.” I must have hit a nerve, because people started commenting and liking the post within minutes of my hitting the publish button. I must admit, it was quite exciting!

Are you wondering why you should be prepared when one of your posts is finally picked up by Pulse? I recommend being ready because when it happens, you’re probably going to receive a lot of comments, likes, shares, and new followers. It’s simply good etiquette to acknowledge your followers and reply to their comments, regardless of whether you’re posting through the LinkedIn publishing platform or another blog site. And people do seem to like leaving comments on LinkedIn posts…some less nicely than others. Since comments are not moderated, you need to be ready for anything.

 

Have you started using the LinkedIn publishing platform yet? If so, how do you feel about your results so far? I’d love to hear what you think about it.

 

Related Resources:

LinkedIn Long-Form Posts on LinkedIn – Overview

About the author

Jennifer Hanford Jennifer Hanford is a self-proclaimed social media and inbound marketing enthusiast. She is owner and managing director of j+ Media Solutions. j+ provides social and content solutions for small B2Bs.

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  • Pingback: 3 Tips to Help You Rock the Linkedin Publishing...

  • http://www.cendrinemarrouat.com/ Cendrine Marrouat

    Hello Jennifer,

    Like you, I am quite pleased with the publishing platform. And you are right, when articles get picked by the Pulse team, engagement becomes HUGE.

    I also agree with you when you say that snackable content reigns supreme on LinkedIn. People don’t have time to read long posts.

    Great article, thank you!

    • http://jplussocial.com Jennifer Hanford

      Thank you, Cendrine! I appreciate your comments and compliments.

    • http://www.memarketingservices.com/ Mandy Edwards

      Hi Cendrine! I can second your comment on Pulse. I had one get picked up a few weeks ago and it went crazy! Thanks for stopping by!

      • http://www.cendrinemarrouat.com/ Cendrine Marrouat

        Great feeling, eh? ;-)

    • Jennifer G. Hanford

      Thank you, Cendrine! I appreciate your comments and compliments. (Sorry, I had replied sooner through WP but didn’t realize it hadn’t posted).

  • Pingback: 3 Tips to Help You Rock the Linkedin Publishing...

  • Pingback: 3 Tips So You Rock New Linkedin Publishing Plat...

  • http://HowToWriteBetter.net/ Suzan St Maur

    Hi Jennifer – as Cendrine says, great article! One question I have that perhaps you can answer … what is the position re: using articles/posts from your own blog on LinkedIn, and vice versa? I have asked this question to several experts and no-one seems to have a definitive answer. Should everything you write for Linked In be original? Will you be penalized by LInkedIn or Google if an article of yours appears on LinkedIn AND your own blogsite? Would be very grateful to know your thoughts on this.

    • http://jplussocial.com Jennifer Hanford

      Thank you for your comments and question, Suzan. I admit, I don’t have a definitive answer to that question either. I have been doing both – writing original posts as well as syndicating posts on LinkedIn. I always make sure to include a link back to the original post when I syndicate on LinkedIn. As far as I know, there are no penalties from either LinkedIn or Google. My personal observation is that my “original” posts seem to do better on LinkedIn (in terms of Likes and comments) than my syndicated ones.

    • http://www.memarketingservices.com/ Mandy Edwards

      Hi Suzan! I’ll step in and answer your question! I have seen publishers do both – post original content and content from their own blog. Personally, I do both, but most are repurposed articles from my blog. I will change up the wording or update the post if I need to so it’s not exactly the same. I do not think there is a definitive right answer since people are posting both types of content. Hope that helps!

    • Jennifer G. Hanford

      Thank you for your comments and question, Suzan. I admit, I don’t have a definitive answer to that question either. I have been doing both – writing original posts as well as syndicating posts on LinkedIn. I always make sure to include a link back to the original post when I syndicate on LinkedIn. As far as I know, there are no penalties from either LinkedIn or Google. My personal observation is that my “original” posts seem to do better on LinkedIn (in terms of Likes and comments) than my syndicated ones. ((Sorry, I had replied sooner through WP but didn’t realize it hadn’t posted).)

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  • http://www.callboxinc.com/ Belinda Summers

    I never know what linkedin Pulse is all about not until I dropped by and read your blog. I’ve also noticed that writing capabilities in linkedin are only open for users who have a lot of connections or maybe to those who have made it to the magic 500+ connections. Yes, thanks for this dose of information.

    • http://jplussocial.com Jennifer Hanford

      Glad to pass along useful information, Belinda. It’s my understanding that all LinkedIn members will eventually have publishing capabilities, regardless of the number of connections. Not sure of the timeline though. Thanks for your comments!

    • http://www.memarketingservices.com/ Mandy Edwards

      Thanks for stopping by Belinda! LinkedIn has been slowly rolling out the publishing platform. I’ve had it since March, but know of others who have just now gotten it.

    • Jennifer G. Hanford

      Glad to pass along useful information, Belinda. It’s my understanding that all LinkedIn members will eventually have publishing capabilities, regardless of the number of connections. Not sure of the timeline though. Thanks for your comments! (Sorry, I had replied sooner through WP but didn’t realize it hadn’t posted).

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  • Pingback: 3 Tips to Help You Rock the Linkedin Publishing...

  • http://www.memarketingservices.com/ Mandy Edwards

    I wish I knew Belinda. All of the platforms have their own rhyme and reason when it comes to these things!

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